artchipel:

Erik Johansson (Sweden/Germany)

Erik Johansson is a full time photographer and retoucher from Sweden based in Berlin, Germany. He works on both personal and commissioned projects and creates sometimes street illusions. Erik creates realistic photos of impossible scenes - capturing ideas, not moments: “To me photography is just a way to collect material to realize the ideas in my mind. I get inspired by things around me in my daily life and all kinds of things I see. Although one photo can consist hundreds of layers I always want it to look like it could have been captured. Every new project is a new challenge and my goal is to realize it as realistic as possible.” Erik has been invited to speak at the TED conference in London on how something can look real but at the same time be impossible.

© All images courtesy the artist

[more Erik Johansson]

yggsassil:

mail-man:

Wait a second. I’ve seen this gif plenty of times before, but I just realised that the picture on the back wall is pole dancing loki holy shit.

holy shIT

yggsassil:

mail-man:

Wait a second. I’ve seen this gif plenty of times before, but I just realised that the picture on the back wall is pole dancing loki holy shit.

holy shIT

(Source: hulkling)

borderlands-confessions:

"I like to think that Krieg is the Pandora version of a superhero. Always has his mask on, has super strength, an imposing figure, and his superpower is that he can transform into a badass psycho with the “Release the Beast” skill."

borderlands-confessions:

"I like to think that Krieg is the Pandora version of a superhero. Always has his mask on, has super strength, an imposing figure, and his superpower is that he can transform into a badass psycho with the “Release the Beast” skill."

dpcphotography:

Pond Side

How’s Ragnar treating you these days?

(Source: violaobanion)

krislapis:

notmysecret:

FUCK

This is 10x funnier if you read it in their voices

(Source: boromirs)

"I did! I killed him. I stabbed him in the heart, when he tried his best to rape me.”

ha-harleyquinn:

Harley Quinn by Minori

ha-harleyquinn:

Harley Quinn by Minori

(Source: ha-harleyquinn)

bobbycaputo:

Murder as Damn(ed) Good Art: Robert Hariman on Organized Crime 
One hundred years ago Italian Futurism was one of the leading edges of modern art.  (A retrospective exhibition is currently up at the Guggenheim and reviewed by the Times here.)   Futurism was distinctively bold, uncannily tuned into the machine age, and violently prophetic during a period of extraordinary turbulence in art and politics.  It also celebrated violence.  Fortunately, few artists today would do that or be admired for doing so.  But they don’t have to, as the art of violence has moved on.
This photograph by Christopher Vanegas was one of the winners in the 2014 World Press Photo Contest.  It was not graced with the wealth of commentary regarding the winner, as one would expect of any contest.  It deserves more attention that it has received, however, and not because we need to fiddle with the rankings in a series of outstanding images.  The winner was a portrait of communication–indeed, an almost pure form of communication–and we ought to be talking about that, but the photo above is a study in both communication and violence, and we really need to be talking about that.
(Continue Reading)

bobbycaputo:

Murder as Damn(ed) Good Art: Robert Hariman on Organized Crime 

One hundred years ago Italian Futurism was one of the leading edges of modern art.  (A retrospective exhibition is currently up at the Guggenheim and reviewed by the Times here.)   Futurism was distinctively bold, uncannily tuned into the machine age, and violently prophetic during a period of extraordinary turbulence in art and politics.  It also celebrated violence.  Fortunately, few artists today would do that or be admired for doing so.  But they don’t have to, as the art of violence has moved on.

This photograph by Christopher Vanegas was one of the winners in the 2014 World Press Photo Contest.  It was not graced with the wealth of commentary regarding the winner, as one would expect of any contest.  It deserves more attention that it has received, however, and not because we need to fiddle with the rankings in a series of outstanding images.  The winner was a portrait of communication–indeed, an almost pure form of communication–and we ought to be talking about that, but the photo above is a study in both communication and violence, and we really need to be talking about that.

(Continue Reading)

tlcplmax:

But here I am…

tlcplmax:

But here I am…

x Odin gave his eye to acquire knowledge, but I would give far more. x

(Source: forged-by-fantasy)